Sep 27,2009

So, week one has come to a close.  There’s still some activities that will continue on from this week, this whole idea of utopia or dystopia, but this diagram is the culmination of this week’s studies.
Some notes:
1.  This was meant to be just a diagram, a series of blocks and vectors.  Ultimately, having an architectural mind, it turned into something that looks like a city plan.
2.  I’m exploring the idea of boundaries, both internally and externally.  The entire city might be contained within a vessel with a permeable edge, something to contain its growth and prevent the city from spilling uncontrollably from a single center.  If the city does become too dense, the boundary can be breached, but in a controlled manner, with services reaching those areas - hence the existence of ‘fringe’ cities.  Just like the development around nodes in the city (there are multiple centers with multiple functions), these are serviced with all necessary transportation and agriculture.  What controls these fringe cities from expanding uncontrollably?  I don’t know yet.
3.  There are a mix of building uses and types throughout the city, each node developing with places to live and places to work.  Each is autonomous, but also relates and connects to other nodes in the city. The issue with slum settlements is that they do exist autonomously, which is great on one level because they were able to develop with no outside help, however, to exist as an island within a city creates fragments that together would work that much better.
4.  There are green spaces in the city, and adjacent to cemetery space.  Agriculture from the periphery moves into the city across the permeable border, interjecting itself into leisure spaces.  Self-sufficiency is important for cities, and being able to feed its own citizens.
5.  The city is also connected to other cities via a shipping network that crosses the site.  From there, the goods would move by smaller vehicles to the different nodes of the city.  I’m still working on that section.
6.  I’m basically ignoring the use of personal automobiles.  Why?  Well, I think I am of the personal opinion that if a city has wide spread transit, if bike routes are created, and we somehow rid ourselves of the idea that vehicle = status, we can have city without vehicles.  They do cause more harm than good.   No doubt I will have to still think about the integration of the automobile into the city, that’s to come also.
Lots still to work on in this plan.

So, week one has come to a close.  There’s still some activities that will continue on from this week, this whole idea of utopia or dystopia, but this diagram is the culmination of this week’s studies.

Some notes:

1.  This was meant to be just a diagram, a series of blocks and vectors.  Ultimately, having an architectural mind, it turned into something that looks like a city plan.

2.  I’m exploring the idea of boundaries, both internally and externally.  The entire city might be contained within a vessel with a permeable edge, something to contain its growth and prevent the city from spilling uncontrollably from a single center.  If the city does become too dense, the boundary can be breached, but in a controlled manner, with services reaching those areas - hence the existence of ‘fringe’ cities.  Just like the development around nodes in the city (there are multiple centers with multiple functions), these are serviced with all necessary transportation and agriculture.  What controls these fringe cities from expanding uncontrollably?  I don’t know yet.

3.  There are a mix of building uses and types throughout the city, each node developing with places to live and places to work.  Each is autonomous, but also relates and connects to other nodes in the city. The issue with slum settlements is that they do exist autonomously, which is great on one level because they were able to develop with no outside help, however, to exist as an island within a city creates fragments that together would work that much better.

4.  There are green spaces in the city, and adjacent to cemetery space.  Agriculture from the periphery moves into the city across the permeable border, interjecting itself into leisure spaces.  Self-sufficiency is important for cities, and being able to feed its own citizens.

5.  The city is also connected to other cities via a shipping network that crosses the site.  From there, the goods would move by smaller vehicles to the different nodes of the city.  I’m still working on that section.

6.  I’m basically ignoring the use of personal automobiles.  Why?  Well, I think I am of the personal opinion that if a city has wide spread transit, if bike routes are created, and we somehow rid ourselves of the idea that vehicle = status, we can have city without vehicles.  They do cause more harm than good.   No doubt I will have to still think about the integration of the automobile into the city, that’s to come also.

Lots still to work on in this plan.



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P
/ sustainable cities / self-sufficient communities / theoretical city exercise / urban
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